Is ObamaCare Killing People?

 Is ObamaCare Killing People?

WSJ 11/16/2017 A new study suggests unintended—and fatal—consequences.

Former President Barack Obama and his advisers claimed that their 2010 health insurance law would create incentives to provide better and more efficient patient care. A new study suggests that one of their bright ideas has since gone disastrously wrong.

This week the Journal reports:

The Affordable Care Act required Medicare to penalize hospitals with high numbers of heart failure patients who returned for treatment shortly after discharge. New research shows that penalty was associated with fewer readmissions, but also higher rates of death among that patient group.

The researchers said the study results, being published in JAMA Cardiology, can’t show cause and effect, but “support the possibility that the [penalty] has had the unintended consequence of increased mortality in patients hospitalized with heart failure.”

The policy went into effect in October 2012 and the new study examines hospital readmission and mortality rates both before and after the penalties were in force. It’s just one study, generated by the experiences of 115,245 Medicare patients hospitalized for heart failure at 416 hospitals between 2006 and 2014. But the results are disturbing:

One in five heart failure patients returned to the hospital within 30 days before the ACA passed. That dropped to 18.4% after the penalties. Mortality rates increased from 7.2% before the ACA to 8.6% after the penalties, or about 5,400 additional deaths a year for Medicare beneficiaries not in managed care plans.

While doctors and researchers consider whether this particular Affordable Care Act policy is killing thousands of patients, the larger question is whether ObamaCare overall is making us less healthy. The implementation of the law has coincided with bad news on U.S. mortality and life expectancy.

Last month the Society of Actuaries reported:

The age-adjusted mortality rate for 2015 was 733.1 (per 100,000), an increase of 1.2% over the 2014 rate of 724.6. This was the first year-over-year increase in the age-adjusted U.S. mortality rates since 2005, and only the seventh year-over-year increase since 1980. In fact, the only other time since 1980 that an annual age-adjusted mortality rate increased by more than 1.0% was in 1993, when the rate increased 2.3% over the 1992 rate.

 

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Dave Hunter selected to Georgia Athletic Coaches Association Hall of Fame

http://www.gwinnettprepsports.com/sports/dave-hunter-selected-to-georgia-athletic-coaches-association-hall-of/article_46dab6cb-5963-5d7f-bc44-73ccab2dc180.html?utm_medium=social&utm_source=email&utm_campaign=user-share

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This Energy Revolution Could Shrink Your Electric Bill

Renewal energy from wind and solar

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Building A Better Future Holds First Of Four Town Hall Meetings

Published by Editor on October 18, 2017.
Published under Jefferson County

Jefferson County Chamber of Commerce hosted the first of four town hall style meetings to address the vision of citizens for Jefferson County. Building a Better Future created in 2007, a program that previously helped bore the Economic Development Alliance, has now lived out its projected distance and members of the Chamber of Commerce are looking for new ideas and a new direction for Jefferson County.

The Tuesday evening meeting took place at Maury Middle School and was facilitated by a representative from the Chamber of Commerce with assistance from the Jefferson County Youth Leadership Class. Elected officials, Chamber Members, IDB Board Members and citizens totaling around 50 in number discussed several topic areas over the hour plus meeting. Of great interest to the largest majority of the group was Broad Ban internet service. Most in attendance touted balance as a goal for the future, meaning bringing in some new business while keeping the feel of the area the same. Recreation, on a broad scale and as an economic booster was mentioned several times as a avenue for future revenue. Most wanted some accountability in education to produce an educated workforce and some were interested in bringing in senior focused industry to the area.

The Town Hall style meetings will continue on October 19, 2017 at White Pine School at 6 pm. The community is encouraged to attend and make their voice heard.

Source: http://jeffersoncountypost.com/?p=44484

Henry Luke was priveleged to facilitate Building a Better Future in 2007.

 

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Shawnee County Commissioner Shelly Buhler

Women of Influence: Shawnee County commissioner proud of work to boost community’s quality of life

Shawnee County Commissioner Shelly Buhler will be honored for community service Wednesday, Sept. 20, at GO Topeka’s 2017 Women of Influence Awards. (Samantha Foster/The Capital-Journal)

When Shelly Buhler reflected this week on her proudest accomplishments as a Shawnee County commissioner, those that came to mind involved long-term benefits to the community.

Her first big vote was tied to major upgrades to the Bettis Family Sports Complex at Lake Shawnee that brought tournaments and revenue into the community. After several years of discussion, a public-private partnership with Waste Management made curbside recycling standard. Just last month, she celebrated completion of the new Willard Bridge, a hard-fought victory that followed years of safety concerns and pleas for funding to replace the deteriorated structure.

Through three terms as a commissioner, Buhler said, she has enjoyed “working on (constituents’) behalf for things that are important to us, not just today, but in the future.”

Buhler will be honored for her community service Wednesday, Sept. 20, at GO Topeka’s 2017 Women of Influence Awards. The awards banquet recognizes women who have influenced decisions on issues and enhanced the quality of life in their community, as well as serving as a role model for inspiring others to change their community.



Buhler grew up in Junction City in a family that instilled in her a commitment to community. Faith, family and community were top priorities, and she looked for ways to contribute.

She graduated in 1987 from Benedictine College — where she met her husband, Steve — with a bachelor’s degree in community services, an interdisciplinary degree combining sociology and human ecology. At the time, she said, she had no idea she would later use it as a politician.

“I think I have used a lot of what I have learned in just being a community volunteer,” Buhler said. “That definitely has been helpful.”

After graduating, Buhler worked as community outreach director for Community Action in Atchison County, where she worked with low-income families. She later worked as assistant director for a regional food bank.

She began volunteering in her Shawnee County church and community while staying home to raise the couple’s three children. She was encouraged by others in the community to run in 2001 for mayor of Rossville.

When Rossville experienced flooding during her second term as mayor, the county’s emergency response efforts piqued her interest in county government. In 2006, she ran mid-term for a seat on the Shawnee County Commission that she has held ever since.

Buhler said she has chosen to be a full-time county commissioner, which allows her time to volunteer with organizations that include the Topeka Community Foundation, for which she chairs the board of directors; Safe Streets Coalition’s Recognition Council; Heartland Healthy Neighborhoods’ leadership team; the Rossville Community Foundation; and Rossville PRIDE. She also is tri-chairwoman for Momentum 2022, a massive, holistic development strategy that will be implemented in 2018.

Involvement with Heartland Visioning made her feel it was important to maintain focus on quality of life and quality of place in the Momentum 2022 plan. Community feedback obtained during the process showed the steering committee that people want to contribute to improving Topeka and Shawnee County, she said.

“I think we’ve listened, and now we need to work together and take some action to improve the quality of life for everybody in our community,” she said. “That’s really hard work.”

Leadership courses, including the 2003 class of Leadership Greater Topeka, introduced Buhler to a different approach to leadership. People approach problems differently and with different perspectives, she said, and she learned skills to help break down barriers so people can work together.

“I hope that I exercise leadership in a positive way,” she said.

For source click here

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Schuylkill County’s Vision

Pottsville, Penn.

Jeanne Elberfeld, new executive director of Schuylkill County’s VISION, recently spoke about her background when she addressed the Pottsville Rotary Club. She joined the VISION staff in February 2016, she said, adding she grew up as an “Army brat” and lived in many places before settling in Schuylkill County, where she raised four children. A medical doctor, Elberfeld practiced until 1997 when she “took a sabbatical that never ended.” She taught various biology courses at Penn State Schuylkill from 2009 to 2016.

After obtaining a master’s degree in social work at Marywood University, Scranton, she joined the faculty and currently teaches there. Schuylkill County’s VISION, she said, was formed in 1998 and seeks to create partnerships of community resources to enhance the community. VISION, she added, is involved in many projects, including the Schuylkill County commissioners’ Youth Summit, blight elimination, the opioid crisis, a dental grant and a preventive public health program. Former VISION Executive Director Kay Jones remains involved with the group in a part-time position, Elberfeld told the Rotarians.

Click here for source.

Henry Luke 9/16/2017

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Saginaw Vision 2020 Update

Gene Pickelman

Hi Henry, A name of the past, Gene Pickelman, community volunteer of the 1000 Leaders Initiative for SCV 2020 in Saginaw. Hope all is well with you. Thought of you several times over the years in how you facilitated the SCV 2020 effort in Saginaw. I hope you have been informed, but your efforts have helped this community be transformed over time. It has been 17 years and we have changed economically, politically, racially and emotionally and spiritually. I think about what would we look like if we didn’t move forward with a plan. Scary! Even though some of the leadership moved away, others have stepped up and we are so much stronger today. The story has not ended yet, as we continue to make improvements in many places. Crime is down, population has settled and relationships have been strengthened at every level. We are now embracing a concept called “conscious capitalism” and hope to have a strong chapter in the region. You probably are aware, but if not, check out “conscious capitalism. org.” I truly know that God’s hand is over us. Just thought I might update you and let you know you made a difference in our lives. Blessings. Gene

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